Nation jubilant as Malala wins Nobel Peace Prize

KARACHI: Pakistani nation went jubilant as young Pakistani girl education advocate Malala Yousafzai won the Malala Yousafzai, along with Indian children’s right advocate Kailash Satyarthi.

“It is a prerequisite for peaceful global development that the rights of children and young people be respected,” the Norwegian Nobel Committee said in awarding the 8 million-krona ($1.1 million) prize. “In conflict-ridden areas in particular, the violation of children leads to the continuation of violence from generation to generation.”

Malal Yousafzai, 17, became the first teenager to be awarded the prize, announced by the Norwegian Nobel Committee in Oslo. Satyarthi, 60, is an Indian children’s rights activist.

While traveling to school in Pakistan’s Swat Valley in October 2012, Yousafzai was shot in the head in retaliation for her campaign for girls to be given equal rights to schooling, defying threats from militants in her hometown of Mingora. The bullet struck just above her left eye, grazing her brain.

She now attends school in Birmingham, U.K., where her father works at the consulate, after being flown to the U.K. for emergency treatment. She gained global recognition after pledging to continue her struggle against illiteracy, poverty and terrorism.

The prize, along with literature, physics, medicine and chemistry honors, was created by Swedish industrialist Alfred Nobel and first awarded in 1901. Winners include the European Union, as well as U.S. President Barack Obama, Martin Luther King Jr. and Mother Teresa.

Yousafzai is the second Pakistani to win a Nobel Prize after Abdus Salam, whose works in the field of particle physics earned him an award in 1979, which he shared with two other scientists.

The prize, worth about $1.1 million, will be presented in Oslo on December 10, the anniversary of the death of Swedish industrialist Alfred Nobel, who founded the award in his 1895 will.

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