Violence increases in election time, says German scholar

Karachi: German Scholar Boris Wilke has said violence in ‘Global South’ comes to politics spastically when elections reach closer.

He was speaking at seminar on ‘Conflict in Global South’ held at Council Room, Department of International Relations, University of Karachi.

Boris Wilke is senior researcher belonging to Institute of Interdisciplinary Research and International Center for Violence Research, University of Bielefeld, Germany.

The seminar was initiated with introductory note on speaker by Prof Dr Moonis Ahmar. He asked a general question that why politics is seen linked to violence in traditional democracies? He suggested that ‘personalized politics’ should be eliminated and there should be balanced and mature politics.

Boris invited youth to join his ongoing project in four countries namely, Central America, Nigeria, Egypt and Pakistan. He said these countries include what he had called global South. He said no country can escape from the violence; even western world witnesses political violence, “but it could be controlled.” He gave the example of Central America where gang war started after the civil war.

He said the violent politicians want to impose their way on the whole system. He said in many countries criminal groups could be political actors. He said a democracy which cannot fulfill its promise of giving people liberty, peace and justice that could witness political violence.

He quoted Mohammed Salman, a researcher in his project from Karachi, that some political parties are involved in political homicide. He further said a targeted operation is under way in Karachi so that target killings be stopped in the metropolis.

He said According to studies, violence enters the politics when elections come closer. On these occasion youth is manipulated to get involved in the violent politics.

He said the youth also have power to change the politics, as the Old Guard Movement was started by youth in Egypt.

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