Day: FPCCI celebrates World Water Day

ISLAMABAD: Depletion, over exploitation and pollution of water resources can increase water scarcity in Pakistan, said Haji Fazal Kadir Khan Sherani, President FPCCI in his address on the occasion of 20th World Water Day’s seminar with the collaboration of HISAAR foundation at Federation House on Tuesday.

He stated that one fourth of developing countries face water shortage and Pakistan is one of them who will face acute shortage in forthcoming years. The increasing imbalance between availability and requirement has led to shortage and unhealthy competition leading to bitter feeling and experience among the water users.

Pakistan has lost one third storage capacity of dams/reservoir, which create difficulties in generation of energy and cultivation of agricultural land. Pakistan is an agrarian economy, which require continuous rise in agriculture production to meet the growing demand of country and to balance the export of country.

At present, our agriculture crops yield is already low compared to other regional and international countries due to shortage and timely not available of water. He recommended the government to early construction of new dams and renovation of existing water resources.

Speaking on the occasion, S M Muneer, President India Pakistan Chambers of Commerce and Industry stated that average 70 percent of our water goes to Arabian Sea every year due to infrastructural weakness and mismanagement. He added that Pakistan is blessed with one of the world best and largest irrigation system, but we are failed to get maximum benefits from this system and utilizing efficiently.

He further stated that the global warming has started the changing of climate. According to climate forecasters, there will be high temperature in forthcoming years which will create irregular pattern of rainfall and quick melting of snow and Pakistan doesn’t prepare itself to coming out from these challenges.

At present, there are many water sector projects related to constructions of new dams and canals such as Gomal Zam Dam, Mirani Dam, Mangla Dam, Satpara Dam, Bhasha Dam and Sabakzai Dam, Rainee Canal, Kachhi Canal and greater Thal Canal are available in Pakistan, but not implemented yet.

He further quoted the World Bank estimates; which indicate that there is acute water crisis in Pakistan and per capita availability of water is 1,066M3, which is below the requirement of 1,700 M3.